MIDI MADE EASY

MIDI MADE EASY

by David “Rainman” Banta

Multi Platinum 2 time Billboard #1 selling mixing engineer/producer

© 2013 www.Platinum-Mixes.com

https://platinummixes.wordpress.com

(754) 444 7246

PlatinumMixes@gmail.com

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B09PhfiZRRxANnZlREtLX0JVSVk/edit?usp=sharing

      In the late 1980’s I bought my first MIDI keyboard. It was a Roland W30, and my first

experience with MIDI.  It took me days to figure out how to play a piano sound. It was very

frustrating. The reason I had so much trouble was because the W30 is more than just a

piano. It’s a music workstation. To even use it, I needed to understand the basics of MIDI

and the common devices used with MIDI for music production.

In the mid 1990s I produced a successful video entitled “MIDI Made Easy”. Since then a

lot has changed. With all the new software and hardware that’s out, the capabilities of

devices used with MIDI have expanded greatly. But when you really come down to it, MIDI

is still MIDI, and when you understand the basics, you’re on your way. This is why that

video is still selling today.

MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a way for different devices used in music

creation and production to communicate with each other.  The 3 basic types of devices

used with MIDI are Controllers, Sound Modules and Sequencers.  Let’s look at each, and

then how they communicate with each other.

CONTROLLERS;

MIDI CONTROLLERS send MIDI messages. Alone they are useless because they don’t

produce any sound. To produce sound you’ll need a sound module. The MIDI controller sends

messages to the sound module and the sound module interprets them and produces the sound.

The four main pieces of information controllers send are

1) What note to play (C3,C4)

2) How long to hold it (gate or sustain time)

3) How loud to play it (velocity sensitivity)

4) What instrument to play (timbre, MIDI channel)

Controllers use gestures to send MIDI messages, like striking a key or drum pad. There are

many types of MIDI controllers. Some common ones are the piano‐style keyboard, drum pads,

even your computer can be a midi controller.

(Below)  M Audio Oxygen 61 piano‐style MIDI Controller

(Below) the Korg K61P piano‐style MIDI Controller

(Below) Roland V Drums MIDI Controller and sound module

Manufacturers even make MIDI controllers for saxophone and trumpet players. When they

blow it sends a Note-On message when they stop it sends a Note-Off message. This

combined with their fingering and the air velocity makes it possible for a horn player to play an

expressive violin part or other instruments.

(Below) Yamaha wind MIDI controller

The simple set up for a controller and sound module is to plug a midi cable from the MIDI

out of the controller, into the MIDI input of the sound module.

I recommend you go to www.sweetwater.com or www.FullCompass.com and search

“Controller” to see some of the different types that are available.

SOUND MODULES;

There are 2 types of sound modules, synthesizers and samplers.  Synthesizers generate

sounds from scratch while samplers record sounds and play them back on cue.

SYNTHESIZERS generate various types of electrical signals and when they are

processed through loudspeakers or headphones they produce sounds. Synthesizers can imitate

other instruments or generate new sounds. By adjusting timbre, attack, and intonation a

synthesizer can imitate the natural behavior of an actual instrument. Common instruments for

a synthesizer to imitate are strings, flutes, and bass guitars. The 3 types of Synthesizers are

analog, digital, and software.

Mini moog analog Synthesizer

Prophet ‘08 analog Synthesizer

Native Instruments “Pro 53” Software Synthesizer

Roland XV‐2020 Digital Synthesizer

SAMPLERS digitally record and play back sounds on cue. A sample is a digital audio

recording. You can record a snare drum and have it play back when you strike a particular key.

Common sample types are audio loops, sound effects, and drum hits.  Sounds that are alike can

be grouped as an “Instrument” or “Patch”. A drum patch could have samples of kick drums,

snare drums, cymbals, etc, each triggered by a different key. You can even sample a violin

playing several notes individually and trigger each with different keys. Most samplers let you

process the sound by time stretching, and adding filters and effects.

(Below)  IK Multimedia’s popular “SampleTank” Sample‐Workstation

Please visit http://www.ikmultimedia.com/

SEQUENCERS;

Sequencers are multi track recorders similar to a reel‐to‐reel or an ADAT except they don’t

record audio, they record MIDI messages in sequence and allow you to edit, and play them

back.

Most sequencers have at least 16 tracks. Software sequencers like Pro Tools and Cubase

often have unlimited tracks. You can record the MIDI notes for a piano on track 1, and then

listen to that while recording the notes for a string on track 2, and so on.  This is called “Over

Dubbing”.

The simple set up for a controller, sequencer, and sound module is

1) Plug a MIDI cable from the out of the controller to the in on the sequencer

2) Plug a MIDI cable from the out of the sequencer to the in on the sound module

These devices are usually placed in the same order whether they are software or hardware.

Once your MIDI data is recorded most sequencers allow you to edit and fix wrong notes or

make other changes.  Copying an 8 bar guitar part from verse 1 to verse 2 is called macro

editing. Changing things like note length and pitch are called micro editing.

I like to think of MIDI as a “Pianola” or player piano, the ones that use a mechanical roll of

paper with the holes in it.  The piano keys are the controller, the paper roll records and plays

back the notes in sequence, and the strings produce the sound.

Many software sequencers have a piano roll style MIDI editor. They allow you to edit your

notes as if they were holes on a piano roll.  By lengthening and moving the holes around you

can edit things like pitch and sustain.

(Above) the”Key Editor” in Cubase 3

Most sound modules are “multi‐timbral,” which means they can produce several different

instruments playing independent parts simultaneously.  This is done using 16 MIDI channels.

When you set your TV to channel 2 it only plays video coming in on that channel. Likewise if you

set your sound module to play a piano on MIDI channel 1 then all the notes coming in on that

channel will play a piano sound.  If you set your sound module to play a string part on channel 2

then all the notes coming in on that channel will play a string sound.  Your controller can also be

set to send any of the 16 channels. In this case if you set it to send channel 1 you’ll hear a piano,

channel 2 you’ll hear a string.

MIDI doesn’t send a continuous play signal. When you strike the key it sends a Note‐On

message and when you release it, it sends a Note‐Off message. This is one of the reasons that

MIDI files are so small.  While audio files can quickly fill your hard drive, you needn’t worry

about MIDI files.

THE W30

The W30 is a music workstation. It has a controller, sequencer, and sound module (sampler).

Even though they’re in one box they still work the same.

In order to play a piano sound I would have had to set the sound module to play a piano on

MIDI channel 1, and set the controller to send MIDI channel 1.

I still need to write a conclusion paragraph here

Dave

MIDI MADE EASY

by Dave “Rainman” Banta
Multi Platinum producer/engineer/pianist
copyright 2013
www.Platinum-Mixes.com

Click here to view this article with photos

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B09PhfiZRRxANnZlREtLX0JVSVk/edit?usp=sharing

      In the late 1980’s I bought my first MIDI keyboard. It was a Roland W30, and my first

experience with MIDI.  It took me days to figure out how to play a piano sound. It was very

frustrating. The reason I had so much trouble was because the W30 is more than just a

piano. It’s a music workstation. To even use it, I needed to understand the basics of MIDI

and the common devices used with MIDI for music production.

In the mid 1990s I produced a successful video entitled “MIDI Made Easy”. Since then a

lot has changed. With all the new software and hardware that’s out, the capabilities of

devices used with MIDI have expanded greatly. But when you really come down to it, MIDI

is still MIDI, and when you understand the basics, you’re on your way. This is why that

video is still selling today.

MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a way for different devices used in music

creation and production to communicate with each other.  The 3 basic types of devices

used with MIDI are Controllers, Sound Modules and Sequencers.  Let’s look at each, and

then how they communicate with each other.

CONTROLLERS;

MIDI CONTROLLERS send MIDI messages. Alone they are useless because they don’t

produce any sound. To produce sound you’ll need a sound module. The MIDI controller sends

messages to the sound module and the sound module interprets them and produces the sound.

The four main pieces of information controllers send are

1) What note to play (C3,C4)

2) How long to hold it (gate or sustain time)

3) How loud to play it (velocity sensitivity)

4) What instrument to play (timbre, MIDI channel)

Controllers use gestures to send MIDI messages, like striking a key or drum pad. There are

many types of MIDI controllers. Some common ones are the piano‐style keyboard, drum pads,

even your computer can be a midi controller.

(Below)  M Audio Oxygen 61 piano‐style MIDI Controller

(Below) the Korg K61P piano‐style MIDI Controller

(Below) Roland V Drums MIDI Controller and sound module

Manufacturers even make MIDI controllers for saxophone and trumpet players. When they

blow it sends a Note-On message when they stop it sends a Note-Off message. This

combined with their fingering and the air velocity makes it possible for a horn player to play an

expressive violin part or other instruments.

(Below) Yamaha wind MIDI controller

The simple set up for a controller and sound module is to plug a midi cable from the MIDI

out of the controller, into the MIDI input of the sound module.

I recommend you go to www.sweetwater.com or www.FullCompass.com and search

“Controller” to see some of the different types that are available.

SOUND MODULES;

There are 2 types of sound modules, synthesizers and samplers.  Synthesizers generate

sounds from scratch while samplers record sounds and play them back on cue.

SYNTHESIZERS generate various types of electrical signals and when they are

processed through loudspeakers or headphones they produce sounds. Synthesizers can imitate

other instruments or generate new sounds. By adjusting timbre, attack, and intonation a

synthesizer can imitate the natural behavior of an actual instrument. Common instruments for

a synthesizer to imitate are strings, flutes, and bass guitars. The 3 types of Synthesizers are

analog, digital, and software.

Mini moog analog Synthesizer

Prophet ‘08 analog Synthesizer

Native Instruments “Pro 53” Software Synthesizer

Roland XV‐2020 Digital Synthesizer

SAMPLERS digitally record and play back sounds on cue. A sample is a digital audio

recording. You can record a snare drum and have it play back when you strike a particular key.

Common sample types are audio loops, sound effects, and drum hits.  Sounds that are alike can

be grouped as an “Instrument” or “Patch”. A drum patch could have samples of kick drums,

snare drums, cymbals, etc, each triggered by a different key. You can even sample a violin

playing several notes individually and trigger each with different keys. Most samplers let you

process the sound by time stretching, and adding filters and effects.

(Below)  IK Multimedia’s popular “SampleTank” Sample‐Workstation

Please visit http://www.ikmultimedia.com/

SEQUENCERS;

Sequencers are multi track recorders similar to a reel‐to‐reel or an ADAT except they don’t

record audio, they record MIDI messages in sequence and allow you to edit, and play them

back.

Most sequencers have at least 16 tracks. Software sequencers like Pro Tools and Cubase

often have unlimited tracks. You can record the MIDI notes for a piano on track 1, and then

listen to that while recording the notes for a string on track 2, and so on.  This is called “Over

Dubbing”.

The simple set up for a controller, sequencer, and sound module is

1) Plug a MIDI cable from the out of the controller to the in on the sequencer

2) Plug a MIDI cable from the out of the sequencer to the in on the sound module

These devices are usually placed in the same order whether they are software or hardware.

Once your MIDI data is recorded most sequencers allow you to edit and fix wrong notes or

make other changes.  Copying an 8 bar guitar part from verse 1 to verse 2 is called macro

editing. Changing things like note length and pitch are called micro editing.

I like to think of MIDI as a “Pianola” or player piano, the ones that use a mechanical roll of

paper with the holes in it.  The piano keys are the controller, the paper roll records and plays

back the notes in sequence, and the strings produce the sound.

Many software sequencers have a piano roll style MIDI editor. They allow you to edit your

notes as if they were holes on a piano roll.  By lengthening and moving the holes around you

can edit things like pitch and sustain.

(Above) the”Key Editor” in Cubase 3

Most sound modules are “multi‐timbral,” which means they can produce several different

instruments playing independent parts simultaneously.  This is done using 16 MIDI channels.

When you set your TV to channel 2 it only plays video coming in on that channel. Likewise if you

set your sound module to play a piano on MIDI channel 1 then all the notes coming in on that

channel will play a piano sound.  If you set your sound module to play a string part on channel 2

then all the notes coming in on that channel will play a string sound.  Your controller can also be

set to send any of the 16 channels. In this case if you set it to send channel 1 you’ll hear a piano,

channel 2 you’ll hear a string.

MIDI doesn’t send a continuous play signal. When you strike the key it sends a Note‐On

message and when you release it, it sends a Note‐Off message. This is one of the reasons that

MIDI files are so small.  While audio files can quickly fill your hard drive, you needn’t worry

about MIDI files.

THE W30

The W30 is a music workstation. It has a controller, sequencer, and sound module (sampler).

Even though they’re in one box they still work the same.

In order to play a piano sound I would have had to set the sound module to play a piano on

MIDI channel 1, and set the controller to send MIDI channel 1.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s